Children’s Health Channel Report

New Options for Childhood Birthmarks

CHARLESTON, S.C. (Ivanhoe Newswire) — Hemangiomas are one of the most common birthmarks in babies, occurring in up to 10 percent of births. In more than 80 percent of cases, they’re in visible areas like the face and neck. The prevailing medical advice used to be “leave it alone, it will go away.” But that’s often not the case. Now, doctors are taking a more proactive approach in tackling a birthmark before a child is even aware they have one. Little Ainsley Tate is the light of her mother’s life.

“A child’s love is just so innocent,” Virginia Tate, Ainsley’s mother, tells Ivanhoe. But just after she was born, elation turned to worry. Virginia noticed a small red mark on her daughter’s face. A couple months later, it had grown into a large bump. “Of course, I started thinking like a tumor or something,” Virginia said.

It was a tumor, a hemangioma or vascular birthmark. It wasn’t cancerous, but Virginia was worried it could still affect her daughter’s life.

“Whenever we would walk through the stores, little kids would go, ‘Mommy, what’s wrong with her?’” Virginia explains.

Most hemangiomas grow for up to a year. All will regress, which is why many doctors say if you leave them alone, they’ll go away. But regression can be slow, and for most patients, the tumor doesn’t completely disappear. “So, you ended up and still end up with children waiting years with these large, bulky lesions,” Marcelo Hochman, M.D., a facial plastic surgeon at Hemangioma International Treatment Center/Roper St. Francis Healthcare in Charleston, South Carolina explains.

While some doctors hesitate to operate on hemangiomas, Dr. Hochman is taking a more aggressive approach. “We just remove them,” Dr. Hochman said.

After putting her under anesthesia, he surgically removed Ainsley’s birthmark. Dr. Hochman also removes hemangiomas using lasers. “What you’ll see is a bright light and then sort of a puff of cold air or sort of a cloud,” Dr. Hochman explains.

Results can be life changing like with little Emma, found in an orphanage in china and deemed unadoptable. “The greatest thing of all this is that she actually was adopted,” Dr. Hochman said.

Ainsley hasn’t skipped a beat. Changing care and giving hope. Some doctors believe hemangiomas are caused when cells from the placenta get lodged into the baby and grow. The vascular birthmarks are 3-5 times more common in females, especially those with fair skin. They occur less frequently in African American babies.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Roper St. Francis Healthcare Physician Referral
Charleston, SC
(800) 863-CARE (2273)

Children’s Health Channel – Hemangiomas Research

Children’s Health Channel

Research Summary

New Options for Children’s Birthmarks

BACKGROUND: Vascular birthmarks, including hemangiomas and other malformations, occur in roughly 10 percent of births, which adds up to about 400,000 babies every year in the United States. Hemangiomas are the most common form of benign tumors affecting infants. They affect five-times more girls than boys and occur more often in individuals with lighter skin. Most hemangiomas (80 percent) are found on the face and neck. Many times, they are not visible at birth but appear after a child turns one month old. It is believed hemangiomas are a result of cells from the placenta that travel to the baby where they stay and grow.

There are different degrees of hemangiomas. Superficial ones affect only the upper layer of the skin. Deep hemangiomas are those that form a lump on the skin. Compound hemangiomas are both superficial and deep. Sometimes, hemangiomas may interfere with vision, breathing, hearing or eating, or can be life-threatening. Hemangiomas also don’t always occur on the outside of the body. If an individual has more than six or seven external hemangiomas, doctors perform an exam to look for internal ones.

DON’T WAIT, TAKE ACTION: Often, parents are given the advice, “Leave it alone; it will go away.” However, as treatments are continually advancing, this is becoming an unacceptable practice. Hemangiomas grow for up to 12 months and then start to regress; however, that regression can be slow for some patients. Even after regressing, hemangiomas typically still aren’t cosmetically acceptable for many patients.

TREATMENT: There are several ways hemangiomas can be treated. During its growing phase, patients may be prescribed steroids to help slow down the growth of the hemangioma. They can be removed surgically, but many doctors opt for laser treatments. The pulsed dye laser (PDL) is used to treat superficial components and reduce redness. It is sometimes used in combination with other treatments. Other types of lasers that are used include the Nd:YAG for treating deep hemangiomas such as in the oral cavity and larynx and the C02 or Erbium lasers for treating scar tissue and improving skin texture.

For More Information, Contact:
Roper St. Francis Healthcare Physician Referral
Charleston, SC
(800) 863-CARE (2273)

Hemangioma Story Continues to Run

Hemangioma Story Continues to Run

“New Options for Childhood Birthmarks”

Visit this link to view the ABC KFSN-TV broadcast
http://abclocal.go.com/kfsn/story?section=news/health/health_watch&id=7261008&rss=rss-kfsn-article-7261008

FEB 6 2010 1:01AM PT
New Options for Childhood Birthmarks
KFSN-TV [ABC 30] Television Website FRESNO-VISALIA, CA

View Hemangiomas are one of the most common birthmarks in babies, occurring in up to 10 percent of births. In more than 80 percent of cases, they’re in visible areas like the face and neck. The prevailing medical advice used to be “leave it alone, it will go away.”

Now, doctors are taking a more proactive approach in tackling a birthmark before a child is even aware they have one. Little Ainsley Tate is the light of her mother’s life. “A child’s love is just so innocent, Virginia Tate, Ainsley’s mother, tells Ivanhoe. But just after she was born, elation turned to worry. Virginia noticed a small red mark on her daughter’s face.

A couple months later, it had grown into a large bump. “Of course, I started thinking like a tumor or something, Virginia said. It was a tumor, a hemangioma or vascular birthmark. It wasn’t cancerous, but Virginia was worried it could still affect her daughter’s life. “Whenever we would walk through the stores, little kids would go, ‘Mommy, what’s wrong with her?
“Whenever we would walk through the stores, little kids would go, ‘Mommy, what’s wrong with her? Virginia explains. Most hemangiomas grow for up to a year. All will regress, which is why many doctors say if you leave them alone, they’ll go away. But regression can be slow, and for most patients, the tumor doesn’t completely disappear. “So, you ended up and still end up with children waiting years with these large, bulky lesions, Marcelo Hochman, M.D. a facial plastic surgeon at HemangiomaInternational Treatment Center/Roper St. Francis Healthcare in Charleston, South Carolina explains. While some doctors hesitate to operate on hemangiomas, Dr. Hochman is taking a more aggressive approach. “We just remove them, Dr. Hochmansaid. After putting her under anesthesia, he surgically removed Ainsley’s birthmark. Dr. Hochman also removes hemangiomas using lasers. “What you’ll see is a bright light and then sort of a puff of cold air or sort of a cloud, Dr. Hochman explains. Results can be life changing like with little Emma, found in an orphanage in china and deemed unadoptable. “The greatest thing of all this is that she actually was adopted, Dr. Hochman said. Ainsley hasn’t skipped a beat. Changing care and giving hope. Some doctors believe hemangiomas are caused when cells from the placenta get lodged into the baby and grow. The vascular birthmarks are 3-5 times more common in females, especially those with fair skin. They occur less frequently in African American babies.

Focus to Find a Cure for Tumors

Doctor wants city to be hub for hemangioma research

By David Quick
The Post and Courier
Tuesday, June 15, 2010

From a medical standpoint, it’s a common benign tumor, but the damage to the patient is emotional and can last a lifetime.

Dr. Marcelo Hochman

Hemangiomas, or vascular anomalies (abnormal lumps made up of blood vessels), appear in the first few days and weeks after birth and are medically benign. Treatments are available and can prevent children from having to grow up with the mental anguish of a facial abnormality.

Hemangiomas, aka “vascular anomalies,” can develop in the days and months after birth. One in 10 babies has a vascular anomaly and 80 percent of the tumors occur on the face.

“One-third of them should get treatment,” says Dr. Marcelo Hochman, a plastic surgeon at The Facial Surgery Center.

Hochman first became interested in hemangiomas when one of his sons had one on his chest. Since then, he has helped treat hundreds of kids with the tumors. He is spending a week this month in Manila, Philippines, doing free surgeries for the Hemangioma International Treatment Center, as well as training other physicians how to do the surgeries.

Closer to home, Hochman is working to make Charleston the national hub for treatment of hemangiomas and research toward finding a cure so that surgery and the potential scarring become unnecessary.

Hochman thinks that a cure likely will be discovered in 10 to 15 years and will likely come in the form of a drug given to children who develop a hemangioma or have been tested at birth and show a propensity to develop one.

Earlier this month, Hochman spearheaded an effort that brought researchers from Harvard, Johns Hopkins and the Medical University of South Carolina as well as about 70 primary care physicians from across the region and a biomedical venture capital firm to Bon Secours St. Francis Hospital for a conference on the subject.

“What we are trying to do is to have everyone sit down, and if we agree that our goal is finding a cure, which it is, then we need to work together,” says Hochman.

He adds that Charleston is the ideal location for that to happen because it is a destination, it has the clinical and research facilities and a hospitality industry that is the envy of most cities.

Hochman says the group of physicians and researchers, which adopted the name the “Vascular Anomaly Research Alliance,” already is planning a return visit in February.

Dr. Hochman and His Team Return to Manila, Philipines

The Vascular Birthmarks Program– Philippines was successfully launched at Makati Medical Center on June 26, 2008 with the assistance of Dr. Hochman and Dr. Deveikis.

The doctors returned to the National Children’s Hospital on June 11 this summer for ten days to continue their work of educating physicians about vascular anomalies, evaluating and treating several of the children from the area with physicians attending and learning. Through an alliance of the Rotary Club of Makati West (“RCMW”), the Makati Medical Center (“MMC”), the GMA Kapuso Foundation (“Kapuso”), and The Hemangioma Treatment Foundation of Charleston, South Carolina (“THTF”), the mission of the Program is to contribute towards the treatment of hemangiomas and other vascular birthmarks and malformations in Filipino children and young adults who are unable to afford such treatment, as well as to educate and train local physicians in the regular monitoring, counseling, and treatment of these afflictions.

Ezekiel in the photos below was one of Dr. Hochman’s patients on that first visit and was shown in a broadcast about birthmarks on GMA News in the Philippines. On the right is the photo of Ezekiel with Dr. Hochman this year.

Manila Team in 2008

Thirty Physicians Attend Educational Symposium

Dr. Hochman Welcomes Physicians from Southeast
Vascular Anomalies and Hemangiomas and Malformations:
They Don’t Just ‘Go Away’

For the third consecutive year a new group of family medical practice physicians, dermatologists and pediatricians attended the Annual Educationall Symposium held by Dr. Hochman at Roper St. Francis Hospital to learn more about vascular anomalies and their treatment and referral. The attendees agreed that the discussions contained excellent educational content which would have a positive impact on their practices. They said that the knowledge they gained was essential for primary care and front line treatment of vascular anomalies. The meeting was concluded following a question and answer period.

An impressive line-up of speakers were on hand to share their expertise in the management and treatment of these malformations:

Denise Adams, MD FACP is the medical director of Cincinnati Childrens’ Hemangioma and Vascular Malformations Center. Her experience lies in the treatment of these anomalies and in the development of clinical trials for these patients.

Imran Chaudry, MD is a Neuroradiologist and Neurointerventionalist at MUSC. His areas of interest are aneurysms, AVMs, AVF, stroke intracranial atherosclerotic disease and congenital vascular anomalies. He discussed interventional radiology treatment.

Anne Comi, MD MBA is an Associate Professor in Neurology and Pediatrics at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and the Johns Hopkin School of Medicine. She directs the Hunter Nelson Sturge-Weber Center where patients can receive multidisciplinary evaluations and participate in research.

Marcelo Hochman, MD FACS is the Medical Director of The Hemangioma Treatment Foundation and the Hemangioma International Treatment Center. He has over twenty years of experience treating patients with vascular anomalies. Last year marked the 1000th patient such patient he has treated.

Thuy L. Phung, MD is a board-certified pathologist and cancer research scientist. She specializes in skin pathology and is a staff dermatologist at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Her research focuses on finding new therapy for hemangiomas by investigating the molecular pathways that drive the development and growth of these lesions.

3rd Annual Educational Symposium

Dr. Hochman Holds Physicians’ Symposium Saturday, June 11, 2011
Every year, 400,000 children are born in the US affected by a hemangioma or vascular malformation. Primary Care physicians, such as pediatricians, dermatologists and family physicians are the first to see these children. In an effort to bridge the gap between what the general medical community knows and what options are available for care of these children, The Hemangioma Treatment Foundation is hosting this medical educational meeting.

Under the direction of Marcelo Hochman MD, a recognized expert in the treatment of these children, a distinguished faculty will be teaching the course. Experts from Johns Hopkins University, Baylor College of Medicine, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and Medical University of South Carolina will be participating. Primary care physicians from South and North Carolina have been invited to attend this half day event and receive world class education and Continuing Medical Education credits. The event is underwritten by private funds and grants to THTF. Physicians interested in attending may register online through the home page of our website.

2011 Cowboy Couture Gala Rip-Roaring Fun!

Cowboy Couture 2011 Outstanding!

The 300 guests attending this event were treated to a night to remember. Firewater was served to the revelers at the saloon’s bar while shoppers checked out the silent auction items laid out nearby. The tables and lighting were beautiful, thanks to PDA Lighting and Sound and Out of Hand Events.

There was a battle royal between Table 27 whose occupants declared war on Table 28 because they had threatened to “out Cowboy” them. The shoot-out got pretty noisy at times but had everyone laughing.

Lexus of Charleston Table says:

“We are so pleased to have been a part of the Cowboy Couture last night. Thought you might enjoy this picture we took of our staff members present. Thank you again for the wonderful work you do!”                          The group The Brillers played during the dinner of elegant chow by Cru Catering, voted the #1 caterer in Charleston. To get the party moving, Emcee Ken French quieted down the gunslingers and got rest of the participants in a fever pitch about the purpose of these fantastic events–the children. Dr. Buncan spoke of her two months studying with Dr. Hochman this year thanks to the generous donations made to finance her trip here from the Philippines. Then Auctioneer, Linda Page, raised the excitement in the room with the awesome auction items and trips.

Then the Memmenger started to rock with the dance beat of the THE MAXX, the fabulous dance band from Atlanta. What a great time everyone had!

To check out all of the fabulous photos taken that evening, go to http://colemanphotography.smugmug.com/Other/2011-Cowboy-Couture-Gala/19162496_WJCS6Q

Also be sure to watch the video about Dr. Hochman and the children shown at the Gala:

SPECIAL THANKS

Benefactors: Roper St. Francis Healthcare * Brian and Gretchen Cuddy * Joan and John Hackenberg * John and Marlene Beauston * John anc Catherine Faris * PDA, Jeff Nichols

Table Hosts: Nick Palassis, Dr. David White, Tom & Debbie Mather, Chris & Mace Brown, Blue Cross Blue Shield of SC, Tommy Peters, Noreen Powers & Louise Fraff, Jack & Michele Hensel, Center for Colon Cancer Research at USC, Bank of SC, Keith & Missy Sauls, Lexus of Charleston, Kris & Marc Dubick, Mark & Amy Goedecke, Brad & Ellen Rickenbaker, Lisa Thomas, Mike & Sherry DuPree, Andrew & Stacey Boucher

 

Dr. Hochman’s Filipino Associate

Dr. Buncan from the Philippines Speaks at this year’s Gala

Due to the fabulous generosity of the attendees of the 2010 Cowboy Couture, Dr. Abigail Buncan was able to travel from the Philippines to study and work with Dr. Hochman for two months this year. THTF, the Rotary Club of Makati West and the Makati Medical Center are continuing to pursue the vascular birthmarks program they launched in the Philippines three years ago. Dr. Buncan is part of that effort. She returned to Charleston as a keynote speaker at the 2011 Cowboy Couture Event this week. Here is what she said:

“In behalf of all of the Filipino children whom we are serving and will continue to serve, I would like to thank each and every one of you from the bottom of my heart for this great opportunity you have given me to be able to further my training in vascular anomalies under of course the great expert in hemangioma, my mentor, Dr. Marcelo Hochman, whose indefatigable commitment to service, training and research inspires everyone who comes to know his great work.

He has been so helpful, generous, selfless and patient in guiding me since last year in providing the best care possible to all our Filipino patients, especially the underprivileged ones, the same best care patients here are receiving.

And now through your efforts, I know that we would be able to extend this help not only to my country, the Philippines, but also to all the other Asian countries as well, as we will soon establish the Manila Hemangioma Center.

When you read the Bible, almost 30% of it speaks about loving the poor.

St. Matthew said (19:21) ‘If you wish to be perfect, go, sell what you have and give to the poor. And you will have treasure in heaven. Then come, follow me.’

St. John Cyrysostom once said: ‘Not to enable the poor to share in our goods is to steal from them and deprive them of life. The goods we possess are not ours, but theirs.’

Loving the poor shouldn’t be an outreach. It should be a lifestyle.

Don’t just donate; join a ministry for the poor –  JOIN THE HEMANGIOMA TREATMENT FOUNDATION!

And you know what? Something will happen – you will begin to have a new heart – a heart that loves the poor.

Thank you very much!”

Dr. Hochman (left) with Dr. Buncan on his right at Cowboy Couture Gala